UX and conversion: how to guide users

A week ago the SEO team at Internet República attended the congress #BrightonSEO2016, where I had the honour to be present at the talk given by Aferdita Pacrami (CEO of 90 Digital) about “What games can teach us about user experience and conversion.”

In principle it would be natural that these kind of games were not linked to the user experience of a website, and even less with the success in conversion. However, I think that Aferdita not only found a different way of telling things, but she made things easier to understand for those who do not link these concepts.

If you are very interested in the topic, at the end of this article you can find a link to Aferdita’s presentation where you can see each point in detail. The reason is that first I would like to highlight the most interesting aspects that you may find useful if you are worried about your user experience to improve the conversion rate of your web.

What are the points in common between players and users?

1- Move forward in each stage:

If we consider that buying is the final stage, how important it is to choose the right way to overcome it. But we cannot wait until the user discovers by him or herself, because he or she can give up or visit another website that is more convenient to use. To avoid this, we can use visual resources such as lines, colours or lights, so that we can easily guide our users through the fastest path to conversion. How many times have we used a light point to cling on a colourful edge or found the exit thanks to a light point?

Another interesting aspect is that if you use images that create the impression of movement, you can use them to catch the attention and make them point towards your CTA (like a button for call to action). I leave here an example that summarizes many of these points in one:

ejemplo UX y conversion dirige visualmente

 

 

2- Secondary missions:

Many times, before we finish a game, or even to play it again we have to complete secondary missions. In a web environment, these would be micro conversions such as registering to a newsletter, sharing on social networks, watching the promotional or explanatory video, become a follower, get in touch to solve doubts, etc. In the same way that it is very difficult to reach or kill the final enemy from the very beginning, we should not think that every time we make an impact on a person, he or she will make the purchase.

Create different micro conversion events for your webpage/business, and adapt your strategy to each. Your goal is that they make a macro conversion. For example, do not use your newsletter to increase your followers on social networks, do not prevent visitors to your web watch a video without subscribing. Let your users be more informed about the product/service they are going to take, and turn them into benefiters of the conversions.

misiones secundarias - microconversiones

 

3- Avoid death:

There is nothing as frustrating for players as killing their character and starting over a mission. The same goes for checking a web to find out that the rate of purchase give up is very high or increasing. For this, we have to make sure that we do not have any webpage leading to a dead end. A good way to do this is creating conversion points in both the channels and pages conceived for the micro conversions and the macro conversions (the final goal).

We have to avoid points of return at the beginning or which prevent going back. A dissatisfied user is very unlikely to come back to us.

 

evitar la salida de un usuario

If you need more examples on how to learn from videogames about UX and conversion, you can have a look at the examples by Aferdita Pacrami during her speech in Brighton.

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